Thursday, May 30, 2013

My Visitations


I often reflect upon Mary's visitation to Elizabeth (Luke 1:39-56).  I think about the fact that the original scene probably attracted little attention from observers.  Two women, two relatives, greeted one another.  It was something that happened all the time.   

No one watching would have shouted out: "Quick!  Come see!   Here's a scene that will be written about in the Bible!"  

Mary visited Elizabeth because both had first BEEN Visited - Mary in a totally unique way, of course.  She came to Elizabeth carrying God Himself within her.  

What particularly strikes me is that while I do not carry Jesus in the same way Mary did, I can indeed carry Him in my heart. 

“Perhaps you yourselves do not realize that Christ Jesus is in you..” (2 Corinthians 13:5)

"We may well tremble to think what sanctuaries we are, when the Blessed Sacrament is within us."  (Frederick William Faber)  


Imagine.  The Lord of the universe within us, within me.  Imagine.  

And I have the opportunity to "carry Him" to everyone I meet. 

What might happen if I make a conscious effort to go through today "on visitation?"

What if I first visit the Lord in prayer, and then specifically visit every person I encounter with the love of Christ?  This does not mean I have to say or do anything that will draw attention.  It may mean that I pray a silent aspiration for the letter-carrier, smile at a harried store clerk, relate to family members with patience.  I might write a note of encouragement, call a lonely relative.

My visitations will be simple and unnoticed.   

But as I carry the love of Christ to those around me, I have a feeling that all of heaven will rejoice.


Painting:  La Visitation, James Tissot, Brooklyn Museum

Portions of the above were previously posted on The Cloistered Heart blog in 2012.

This post is linked to Catholic Bloggers Network Linkup Blitz 

20 comments:

  1. This is beautiful, Nancy. The need to fill our souls with prayer before taking Jesus to visit people struck me most strongly when the children and I used to visit a nursing home. It all turned around, at times, though. I remember once feeding a lady who was paralysed and getting the strong feeling that I was feeding Jesus. And, instead of recognising Jesus in me, the lady in the next bed, who was a lapsed Catholic, told me that I like Mary! I spent quite a while reflecting on that one:-)

    God bless, Nancy:-)

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    1. Vicky, how amazing to be compared to Mary. I love that you and your children went to the nursing home together; what a beautiful way for them to experience carrying the love of Christ to others.

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    2. I don't think it was a personal compliment, Nancy. I think it says more about the strength of the lady's faith that, after all those years away from the Church, she still had a love for Mary in her heart.

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    3. Sorry for my confusion, although I did know what you meant (..I guess?? at my age one can only guess :)...) about the lady still having a love for Mary!

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  2. Preface: I'm almost 43 and inclined to have wild temperature fluctuations. But, everyone in the beautiful Tissot painting above looks exceedingly....warm. His painting of the Annunciation gets me feeling a little sweaty too--Mary looks like she's wearing everything she owns!

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    1. Interesting observation, Jamie! Now I feel compelled to look up Tissot's Annunciation painting, although I may do so with an ice pack close at hand :)...

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  3. Such a nice reflection and reminder Nancy. I have never thought about the visitation of Mary and Elizabeth in this way and how it relates to our own lives. Now every time I pray the Joyful mysteries of the rosary, I'll be thinking of this! Really nice. Thanks for sharing this.

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    1. Thanks, Monica! I've been thinking of my "little visitations" for years, and it really makes a difference for me.

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  4. Nancy, You always give me something new to reflect upon...
    I especially love the idea of thinking "What might happen if I make a conscious effort to go through today "on visitation?"
    Thank you for sharing your meditative treasures.
    Blessings +





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  5. Thank you, Nancy, for your emphasis on the Visitation. Of all the mysteries of the Rosary, this has been one of the least inspiring to me - until now. After reading your "visitation" posts over the past few days, I see that the Visitation is really what it's all about: we receive, and then we give. Any other response to God's mercy makes of us a dead end.

    I love your blogs!

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    1. Renee, thank you. This means more to me than I can express! God bless you for such a kind comment.

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  6. "What might happen if I make a conscious effort to go through today "on visitation?"

    What a beautiful challenge you present to us, Nancy!
    I shall try to begin tomorrow with this in mind.
    blessings..Trish

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    1. Thanks, and blessings to you too, Trish!

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  7. Nancy, this post is so beautiful. It boggles my mind when I meditate on the fact that the Lord of all creation lives in us.

    God bless!

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    1. Me too, Mary. I don't think the human mind can even begin to fathom it. God bless you too!

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  8. The Visitation was outwardly and ordinary event, but extraordinary in what was hidden. I fail to think of how extraordinary bringing Christ to others is under the ordinary guise of daily actions. Thanks for this beautiful insight.

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    1. And thank you for YOUR beautiful insight, Barb.

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